Quick hits 2 — Wes Anderson, the mass-murdering Sacklers, California broadband deal, and voting rights

Wes Anderson’s ode to print journalism is a periodic delight. By Peter Bradshaw at The Guardian — Wes Anderson’s latest, “The French Dispatch,” is about 20th Century American journalism, features a French town called “Ennui-Sur-Blasé,” and the cast includes Bill Murray and Frances McDormand. I love it already! Also, this review includes the words “pasticheurs” and “feuilleton.”

— Cory Doctorow: The mass-murdering Sacklers will get to keep billions, thanks to their skill at shopping until they find a corrupt judge.

Governor, Legislative Leaders Reach Deal on $5.25 Billion California Broadband Expansion. By Chris Jennewein at the Times of San Diego — “Gov. Gavin Newsom and the leaders of the Senate and Assembly reached a deal Monday to spend $5.25 billion expanding California’s broadband internet connectivity for families and businesses.”

Vox explains the GOP voting bill that literally caused Texas Democrats to flee the state. By Ian Millhiser — The Texas GOP wants to make it harder for people to vote, make it harder to eject partisan poll-watchers who disrupt the electoral process, and impose draconian penalties for minor violations of voting laws, to prevent repeating imaginary voter fraud.

Biden Labels GOP Voting Laws Greatest Threat to American Democracy Since Civil War. By Zachary Evans at the National Review — “‘The Confederates, back then, never breached the Capitol as insurrectionists did on January the 6th,’ Biden said…. ‘I’m not saying this to alarm you; I’m saying this because you should be alarmed.’”

White House journalists adjust to life after the Trump “gravy train”

Tomorrow Will Be Worse: The Agony and Ecstasy of the Trump Reporters, After the Fall of Trump :

In the weeks before the 2020 election, when it was becoming pretty clear even to the most superstitious and traumatized Democrat that Joe Biden was headed for victory, the journalists of #thistown began to worry. People you’ve likely read or heard of or watched were concerned about what a Trump loss would mean for their career. That was the talk of the town. Sure, Donald Trump had been a disaster for the country, but what would they do after he left the White House?

Even while Trump claimed journalists were enemies of the people, he was a gravy train for news outlets, which have seen ratings and clicks decline 30-45% since Trump left office.

Trump wasn’t just “a gravy train,” says one industry insider. “It’s also juxtaposed to the most boring administration in modern history. You go from a circus with flaming chainsaws to … what? An old man watching his dog?”

The Biden administration is “opaque.” It sticks on-message and PR people argue with reporters over slight differences in wording. That’s business as usual in Washington (my $0.02: also in tech journalism), but it’s jarring for young journalists who came of age covering Trump. Like Olivia Nuzzi, who was 21 when she landed her first 1:1 interview with Trump, is now 28 — she says she has spent most of her adult life covering him.

Says one journalist, “There’s a sense that Biden’s position is fragile and that he has to be protected, that any unkind gaze might knock him over—which plays into every right-wing stereotype,”

Says another: “I don’t know that there’s been a president who’s been so protected and wrapped in so many layers of wool to keep him away from anything remotely approaching an adversarial interview…. Why expose him to any risk? He’s old, he’s lost a few steps. It’s worked for them so far.”